Let’s go to Champagne!

We’ve been travelling around the world for 25 years, because we want to see the landscape and the grapes by our own eyes, and to get to know the producers and the wineries. This time around, we’ll start off in a different way. We are organising this study trip together with the travel agency Yes Travel – to a wine region that is extraordinary by all means, and where there are doors on which a plain mortal would knock in vain.

 

To see Reims cathedral in all its fully-lit glory; to have a bistro lunch with a couple of glasses of champagne; to stroll along the Avenue de Champagne in Épernay, which according to the locals is even more highly valued than the Champs Élysées, as there are millions of bottles under our feet; or to climb the orange-lit steps of Veuve Clicquot that lead from the cellar labyrinth, dug into limestone, to the tasting hall – these are all unforgettable experiences.  

 

The Champagne tour is first and foremost a study trip with a knowledgeable BORsuli colleague who knows everything and will keenly explain it. By the end of the trip, everybody will know the difference between liqueur de tirage and liqueur d’expedition, or the degree the necks of the bottles are cooled to during disgorging, and what autolysis is and will never get confused about how to pronounce Pinot Meunier or remuage correctly in French.  

 

Billecart-Salmon

To see Reims cathedral in all its fully-lit glory; to have a bistro lunch with a couple of glasses of champagne; to stroll along the Avenue de Champagne in Épernay, which according to the locals is even more highly valued than the Champs Élysées, as there are millions of bottles under our feet; or to climb the orange-lit steps of Veuve Clicquot that lead from the cellar labyrinth, dug into limestone, to the tasting hall – these are all unforgettable experiences.  

 

The Champagne tour is first and foremost a study trip with a knowledgeable BORsuli colleague who knows everything and will keenly explain it. By the end of the trip, everybody will know the difference between liqueur de tirage and liqueur d’expedition, or the degree the necks of the bottles are cooled to during disgorging, and what autolysis is and will never get confused about how to pronounce Pinot Meunier or remuage correctly in French.  

 

 

Veuve Clicquot

Veuve Clicquot is the second largest Champagne house, with a long and glorious history that duly matches its size. Under the mango orange-clothed visitor centre, of one of the world’s most famous wine brands is a 24-kilometre long cellar labyrinth in which 32 million bottles are aged. The orange-lit corridors and halls of the former limestone mine, located 20 metres underground, provide a stately sight, but what’s even more important is that the 10-12 ˚C temperature and 90% humidity are provided throughout the year. Veuve Clicquot owns almost 400 hectares of grapes in the most outstanding vineyards of the wine region and annual production reaches 19 million bottles. The basic principle of its winemaking philosophy had been laid by Madame Clicquot in the first part of the 19th century: “Only one quality, the finest”. Estate manager, Dominique Demarville, characterises today’s style of the house as “power, intensity, freshness and silky texture”.

 

Leclerc Briant

Renewal is the tradition at this Champagne house that was founded in 1872. Well ahead of its time, the house changed over to organic growing in the 60s. Then, taking another risky turn, Leclerc Briant took a further step towards the biodynamic approach, and since 2003, most of its grapes have the Demeter (biodynamic) certification. It was also among the first to make single-vineyard champagnes in the mid-70s. In 2010, the death of Pascal Leclerc-Briant and the rigidity of the French inheritance law, almost put an end to the house’s story, but in 2012, an enthusiastic American investor started buying back the dispersed parts of the estate and gave the management back to Hervé Jestin, the most well-known local expert of biodynamics and bioenergy. The cornerstones of the house’s style are: low dosage, minimal sulphur, single-vineyard selections and explosive energy. The continuation of its experimental spirit is proven by the fact that recently Leclerc Briant came up with another speciality: part of its wines are aged in barrels and bottles at the bottom of the sea, at a depth of 60 metres, where the outside pressure is identical to the inside one – this way, oxidation has no chance at all.      

 

 

Deutz

Deutz was founded in 1838 and has been in the ownership of Roederer since 1992, although for the protection of its uniqueness, Deutz enjoys complete autonomy within the company group. The recently renovated main building, the Belle Époque, lets us into a miraculous world (for those few who are allowed in). Deutz is part of the narrowest Champagne elite and knows no compromise, neither in grape growing, nor in the cellar: 80% of the grapes come from Grand Cru and Premier Cru plots; in the cellar, it refrains from the use of barrels for the sake of keeping the freshness; the réserve wines that are used in the blends are young; and Deutz only works with the juice it gets from the first pressing – the rest it sells. Deutz is characterised by aristocratic elegance, freshness, refinement and a creamy texture.

 

Details of the trip:

Date of the trip: June 25-28, 2019 (4 days, 3 nights)

Direct flight to Paris with Air France

Accommodation Continental Hôtel****, Reims

 

The fee includes:

- the flight tickets with one checked in item of luggage

- transfers and private coach transport

- the hotel for three nights in double rooms, with breakfast

- entrance fees to the five Champagne Houses’ private tours with tasting

- the professional guide of Bortársaság

 

For further details, please get in touch with our colleague Andrea Furják: +36 20 343 7447

 

For registration and information at the travel agency:

Yes Travel Kft.

1051 Budapest, Széchenyi István tér 7-8.

Contact: Szöllősi Anita, Györkös Dóra

E-mail: bortura@yestravel.hu

Tel: +36 1 373 0333 (Mon-Fri: 9.00-17.00)